A big tradition for many in northern Illinois is to go out to the infamous Cry Baby Bridge in Monmouth. Sadly, that tradition won't be happening this year, or possibly ever again. The bridge which carries 60th Street over Cedar Creek is reportedly closed to vehicular traffic.

The story surrounding Crybaby Bridge is that there was a fatal accident on the rural road involving children.

If you drive to the bridge and put your car in neutral, the ghosts of the kids will push your car across the bridge. You can sprinkle baby powder on your bumper and you will see their little hand prints in the powder after they push you.

Sadly, the bridge is reportedly closed permanently, due to safety concerns of the bridge's structure. For now, boulders have been put up to block the road to the bridge. Permanent gates are expected to follow.

Cindy Vestal

It's terrible news to hear that such a well known horror-fanatic stop is no longer going to be around and available for our enjoyment.

For thrillseekers in the Land of Lincoln, they'll need to find another place that's as haunted and easily accessible.

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Many have visited the famed bridge. Here are some other documented visits from YouTube:

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